Inoculations in the maternity home

Is it worth it to vaccinate a newborn in the hospital?

Two injections are made in the maternity ward before discharge: against tuberculosis (BCG) and hepatitis B.

Tuberculosis Vaccination

Tuberculosis is a widespread infectious disease caused by various kinds of mycobacteria. According to the World Health Organization, one person is infected with tuberculosis every second and every year 2 million people die from this disease worldwide. Tuberculosis affects everyone, regardless of the conditions in which a person lives. This is a very contagious disease, which is transmitted mainly by airborne droplets and affects various organs, as well as human tissues. Unfortunately, in order to catch mycobacteria, even direct contact with the infected person is not required. It is for this reason that doctors strongly recommend that the child be vaccinated even in the hospital, in order to avoid the possibility of infection after discharge. Without lack of immunity to mycobacteria, the child is at risk. Therefore, it is worthwhile to think twice before giving up BCG.

Vaccination of newborns is carried out on the third day after birth. The vaccine is administered intracutaneously on the surface of the left shoulder. Immediately after the introduction of the vaccine in this place a papule of a white color is formed, which disappears in about 20 minutes. Within two to three months at the vaccination site, a small compaction of not more than 1 mm in diameter is formed, which is finally cicatrized before the end of the first year of life.

BCG vaccination has its contraindications. Do not vaccinate:

  • children who have cases of congenital or acquired immunodeficiency in the family;
  • if other children in the family had complications after such vaccination;
  • children with congenital insufficiency of the function of any enzyme;
  • Children with Heavy Heritage

    BCG vaccination has its contraindications. Do not vaccinate:

    • children who have cases of congenital or acquired immunodeficiency in the family;
    • if other children in the family had complications after such vaccination;
    • children with congenital insufficiency of the function of any enzyme;
    • Children with Heavy Heritage

      BCG vaccination has its contraindications. Do not vaccinate:

      • children who have cases of congenital or acquired immunodeficiency in the family;
      • if other children in the family had complications after such vaccination;
      • children with congenital insufficiency of the function of any enzyme;
      • Children with Heavy Heritagerelated diseases and perinatal CNS lesions.

      In some cases, the vaccination is postponed for a while. Such cases are associated with: infectious processes occurring in the child's body; hemolytic disease of the newborn, which develops because of the incompatibility of the blood of the mother and child; prematurity of the child.

      It is also important to know about the complications that may occur after BCG vaccination:

      • the formation of a painless sore at the vaccination site (ulceration of the infiltrate);
      • the formation of a subcutaneous infiltrate due to too deeply introduced vaccine;
      • the formation of a keloid (scar);
      • spread of infection to the lymph nodes.

      About all possible complications and their manifestations, parents should ask the phthisiatrician beforehand.

      Vaccination against hepatitis B

      Such vaccination is carried out in all developed countries before discharge from the hospital, as newborns have a great chance of becoming chronic carriers of hepatitis B. Viral hepatitis B is an infectious disease, which leads to severe liver damage. This insidious infection can have various forms of manifestation from asymptomatic virus, acute hepatitis, jaundice, liver failure and cirrhosis to liver cancer. Annually in the world of this infection, 1 million people die.

      It is possible to infect hepatitis B even from an insignificant dose of infected blood, got into the blood of a healthy person through damaged skin or mucous membranes.

      The earlier the infection penetrates the child's body, the more likely it is to form into chronic hepatitis. Therefore, doctors try to vaccinate all healthy newborns.

      If a child is born from a mother with a positive status of hepatitis, her child is given such a vaccine within the first twelve hours after birth. The exception also concerns deeply premature babies, to whom the vaccine is administered when their weight reaches 2 kilograms. The remaining children are vaccinated on the selected day before discharge from the hospital.

      The newborn vaccine is injected intramuscularly into the anterolateral lateral surface of the thigh.

      There are two schemes for vaccinating against hepatitis B:

  • the standard, which is carried out according to the scheme: the first vaccination on the selected day, the second one in a month, the third - 6 months after the first;
  • An alternative that is used in emergency cases and is carried out according to the scheme: the first vaccine is administered within the first 12 hours after birth, the second - in a month, the third - in 2 months.

Only a fully completed immunization course can protect the child from infection and give immunity for about 15 years.

As a rule, modern drugs for vaccination against hepatitis B have a high degree of purification, but adverse reactions are still possible. These include:

  • redness, denseness, or discomfort during active movement at the injection site;
  • slight fever and slight malaise;
  • urticaria, rash, muscle or joint pain, erythema nodosum (in very rare cases).

Of course, you decide to do or not to vaccinate your children as parents. Still, try to discuss this issue with the doctors before deciding to refuse vaccination.

Read more: